Sometimes God Seems to Overact by Pastor Melissa Scott

May 24, 2015 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

Sometimes God seems to overact.

There are times I wish God would have knocked me down like He knocked Paul down. God knocked him off of his animal and shined a light and made
him blind, then sent him to a man who had never seen him before who
would tell him everything about him, lay hands on him, pray for him and
he would see again.

That would make a quick believer out of anybody!

When I was doubting, I wanted to find something Thomas had said, and
speak with him. It looks to me like God didn’t quite tighten the screws
on Thomas the way He did on Paul. He boxed Paul in. With others He
deals more gently.

I do not understand the mystery of God’s initiative. I am not a
predestinarian; God leaves room for decision and freedom, but the
initiative starts in God’s sovereign will. It is embodied and immortalized
in that poem about “The Hound of Heaven.” God goes after a man. It
might come from a contact with someone who starts jarring your frame
and opening your eyes, or it might go to the extreme, as in the case of
Paul, where God literally knocks you down or checks you and brings
you to a dead stop on your trail. But anywhere God comes into a life, it
is not an accident. David said, “Where is he?”

In the New Testament, the Son of man came to seek and to save that which was lost. (Luke 19:10) God is the seeker. The first question God asks man in the Bible is “Where are you?”

Now, I could preach for an hour on “the unpardonable sin.” I have heard evangelists trying to scare people to death with stories of someone on a deathbed wanting to come to God, but who could not come. Just scratch that out of your theological portfolio, will you?

The devil is sure not going to make you want to come! Jesus said, “No man
comes unless the Father draws him.” I do not really know what the unpardonable sin is. The Pharisees were guilty of crediting Beelzebub,
the devil, with the acts of Jesus. When Jesus said there is an
unpardonable sin, He referenced that act. Another place in the New
Testament speaks of a “sin unto death.” (1 John 5:16)

The book of Hebrews speaks of those acts for which there is no remission of sin. There are lots of different expressions in the New Testament that speak
of putting one beyond the pale. In Romans 1 and 2, Paul speaks of
believers who know better, but persist in their sins until after a while
God turns them over to a strong delusion, they believe a lie and are
damned; God leaves them alone.

God’s Nature in the Stuff of History by Pastor Melissa Scott

May 3, 2015 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 
Jesus was a friend of sinners: He loved them. I want the 
world to know we love them. We don’t have to condone their sin;
we don’t have to wrap holy robes around ourselves. I don’t think
Jesus made a big deal out of His spirituality. I don’t believe
we have to make people so uncomfortable with our presence all
the time.
If you have God in you, you do not have to work so hard to
announce it. You will be different, because “He that saith he
abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he
walked.” If you are totally committed to Him, if nothing
matters as much to you in this life as doing God’s will, then
that will make you different. His burden will consume
you. You will be aware of His presence in the ordinary stuff
of the day when you iron clothes in the home, when you drive
down the freeway and when you work on the job. The majority
of this community will never come to hear a preacher preach,
but they will watch your sermon, that bringing of God’s
nature into the stuff of history.

Are You Abiding in Jesus? by Pastor Melissa Scott

July 1, 2013 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

That is what I ask of this church today: a band and a company of people who will settle for nothing less than genuine spirituality, who will ask themselves week after week, “Am I abiding in Him?”

Hereby we know, “He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked.” Analyze your commitment: does it match His? If it doesn’t, then draw nigh.

Analyze your concern; if it doesn’t match His, then draw nigh to Him and renew the experience.

Analyze your attitude about being a flowing light of the gospel and a flowing spring of His nature wherever your life, routines, and tedious detail take you.

Analyze your dependence upon what other people do. Analyze your attitude toward the sinner.

Analyze your motives. Do you come to church to be ministered to or do you live to minister? Look at your humility; look at your own results among loved ones. For too long the church world has been running out bellowing with the mouth in little formulas of salvation.

We need to bring that ineffable nature of Jesus until those closest to us will wonder, “What’s made him different? He’s different every day.” That is what spirituality is, and the Spirit came to be that in you and me if you give Him the chance.

God’s Formula for Joy by Pastor Melissa Scott

January 5, 2013 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from the Bible

Another word is also necessary to understand this law: “Let your
moderation be known.” Kenneth Wuest translates this passage:
“Let your reasonableness and your willingness to be content with 
less than your due be known.” Now, English is a funny language.
If you use the word post, you are liable to think of everything from
a fence post to dropping a letter in a mail box to a breakfast cereal.
The English word known has many varieties of meaning, but the Greek
word here is very precise.
There is knowing that can come from just seeing something
and having the mind assimilate it; logically, it is consistent
or it has meaning. There are other kinds of knowing. The Greek
word being used here is a knowing that is the result of
experiencing. It is a knowing that is strictly limited to a
knowledge that occurs only when you experience something.
Paul is saying to these Philippians, and to me and you today,
forever conquered by our circumstance, forever fretting, forever upset,
never exhibiting joy, “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say,
Rejoice.” How? Let your state of mind be known, and let it so be
exhibited, that your willingness to be content with less than your
due will be known. Let it actually so flow out of you that you
are experienced by other people as being that kind of person.
Pastor Melissa Scott continues by saying that's easier to say than to do.
Have you ever seen a family argument? Have you ever been in one?
You are dying to have it made up. But you sit there and boil and
say, “You are going to apologize for every jot and tittle,
item by item, lay them all out and make every single
element right!”
Or somebody has done you some damage. You would like to have peace,
but “He did this to me and I’m going to have my pound of flesh.
I’m going to get what I have coming!”
Pastor Scott goes on to explain that only then, when you’ve forced
it out of them and every inch has been explained, apologized for,
and paid for will we graciously smile and “forgive.”

Fishing for Men and Women by Pastor Melissa Scott

August 12, 2012 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 
Pastor Scott teaches Sundays at Faith Center, Glendale CA

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches

I’m searching for men and women today.  But I’m fishing for the real trophies: the the uncommon kind of person who is not satisfied with the ordinary. So much of life squeezes everybody into the ordinary.

I don’t know what modern society would do with some of the “heroes of faith” if one were to come in and say that a bush talked to him. Or if another (Balaam, not a hero of faith) were to come in and say that his donkey talked to him. But God’s ways are not our ways. (Isaiah 55:8)

God needs some people who are willing to give it their all.

There is a strange saying in the Gospel of John, at the end of chapter 2, speaking of Jesus: “When he was in Jerusalem at the passover, in the feast day, many believed in his name, when they saw the miracles which he did. But Jesus did not commit himself unto them, because he knew all men, And needed not that any should testify of man: for he knew what was in man.”

Pastor Scott continues . . . In the name of evangelism, some people forever picture God, or our Lord, hesitantly waiting outside a heart’s door begging to come in. This is why, in our services, we have added the chorus “He is Lord” to the chorus “He’s the Savior of My Soul.” In the eagerness to get the good news out, we may caricature the fact that God comes in love. He comes to us in love, but He doesn’t come begging.

 

Christ died on Calvary by Pastor Melissa Scott

November 4, 2011 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott Teaching from the Bible

 

Before I did the translation I was living with the spectacles of the King James Version. I had not looked it up. I do not spend all of my days looking up every single verse in the Bible all the time. So with this occasion, something stood out remarkably. “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people, upon thy holy city.” Now we’ve said “thy people” are Daniel’s people, the Jewish people, but we’re going to look to one place, Judah, as the source. Harness that thought in your mind. “Thy people and thy holy city,” Jerusalem, “to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins.”  Now how many have in your Bibles the word sins as plural? “And to make reconciliation for iniquity and to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up the vision in prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.”

Looking briefly at the grammar, we have the preposition “to,” “to finish”; the definite article “the” in “the transgression”; that is okay. “And to put an end,” uses the vav conjunction; “and to” again uses the preposition “to.” But the next part of the translation presents an anomaly when compared to the Hebrew. Literally, it should say, “and to put an end to the sin.” Notice the definite article before the word “sin.” It’s very subtle, but there is a world of difference between  sins in the sense of “the sins of the world,” and the expression “putting an end to sin.”

Pastor Melissa Scott tells us that we are, like the song says, sinners being saved by grace. So what Christ did on Calvary was a once and for all act. I am still in Adam, even though I’m a new creature in Christ. So to put an end definitively to “the sin” means everything that is wrong, including everything that is “missing the mark.” That is the meaning of the Greek word hamartia translated “sin” in the New Testament. It encompasses everything. So we have here “seventy weeks of sevens are decreed upon the people of you, the holy city of you to finish the transgression and to put an end to the sin.”