God’s Formula for Joy by Pastor Melissa Scott

January 5, 2013 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from the Bible

Another word is also necessary to understand this law: “Let your
moderation be known.” Kenneth Wuest translates this passage:
“Let your reasonableness and your willingness to be content with 
less than your due be known.” Now, English is a funny language.
If you use the word post, you are liable to think of everything from
a fence post to dropping a letter in a mail box to a breakfast cereal.
The English word known has many varieties of meaning, but the Greek
word here is very precise.
There is knowing that can come from just seeing something
and having the mind assimilate it; logically, it is consistent
or it has meaning. There are other kinds of knowing. The Greek
word being used here is a knowing that is the result of
experiencing. It is a knowing that is strictly limited to a
knowledge that occurs only when you experience something.
Paul is saying to these Philippians, and to me and you today,
forever conquered by our circumstance, forever fretting, forever upset,
never exhibiting joy, “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say,
Rejoice.” How? Let your state of mind be known, and let it so be
exhibited, that your willingness to be content with less than your
due will be known. Let it actually so flow out of you that you
are experienced by other people as being that kind of person.
Pastor Melissa Scott continues by saying that's easier to say than to do.
Have you ever seen a family argument? Have you ever been in one?
You are dying to have it made up. But you sit there and boil and
say, “You are going to apologize for every jot and tittle,
item by item, lay them all out and make every single
element right!”
Or somebody has done you some damage. You would like to have peace,
but “He did this to me and I’m going to have my pound of flesh.
I’m going to get what I have coming!”
Pastor Scott goes on to explain that only then, when you’ve forced
it out of them and every inch has been explained, apologized for,
and paid for will we graciously smile and “forgive.”

Rejoice in the LORD by Pastor Melissa Scott

September 2, 2012 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

PHILIPPIANS 4:4: “REJOICE.” Circle that word, please. “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice.” When God repeats Himself, pay attention. “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice.”

Have you ever wondered why the apostle Paul in the New Testament and David in the Old Testament are quoted so much and why they have had such an enduring impact on Christianity? Of all men, they seem to have lived the Christian life where we have to live it.

David, the writer of psalms in the Old Testament, knew joy but he also knew defeat and sorrow. He knew victory and he knew isolation; he knew rejection and he knew success. He just about had it all in the way of experience. So he can write to us about what God means in the kind of life that we have to live. You can always find him talking right to the point.

When you read David’s psalms, you don’t have to feel that there is some esoteric, far-out spiritual phraseology that cannot reach you. He speaks to you right where you are.

Paul does the same. Two-thirds of the New Testament Epistles are from his pen. He lived life in the arena. In order that he might give the gospel without charge, he made tents; he worked like other men.

When Paul tells you something, you can always know that he is not preaching down to you, mouthing words. When he says it, inexcusable is the man who says, “He just doesn’t understand what I’m going through or he wouldn’t say that.”

Do you know where Paul was when he said, “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice”? He was in prison, and not a pleasant one, either. Do you know to whom he was writing? To people who 11 years earlier had been born.

Now, the laws of the Spirit involve you taking charge of yourself.

We have been defining faith as more than just belief. It’s hanging your body on what you know God has said in His Word. Will you honestly confess you have been a little guilty on occasion of not being so “moderate,” as we’ve defined it? How many of us can admit we’ve done a little anxious caring recently? Would you like to put God’s law in motion? You can take hold of yourself and say, “I’m going to put God’s law in motion until my family and people around me can know my moderation and can experience the joy I find in the Lord. He is enough.

Take everything else. I know whom I have believed.” Now, claim the victory.

Fishing for Men and Women by Pastor Melissa Scott

August 12, 2012 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 
Pastor Scott teaches Sundays at Faith Center, Glendale CA

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches

I’m searching for men and women today.  But I’m fishing for the real trophies: the the uncommon kind of person who is not satisfied with the ordinary. So much of life squeezes everybody into the ordinary.

I don’t know what modern society would do with some of the “heroes of faith” if one were to come in and say that a bush talked to him. Or if another (Balaam, not a hero of faith) were to come in and say that his donkey talked to him. But God’s ways are not our ways. (Isaiah 55:8)

God needs some people who are willing to give it their all.

There is a strange saying in the Gospel of John, at the end of chapter 2, speaking of Jesus: “When he was in Jerusalem at the passover, in the feast day, many believed in his name, when they saw the miracles which he did. But Jesus did not commit himself unto them, because he knew all men, And needed not that any should testify of man: for he knew what was in man.”

Pastor Scott continues . . . In the name of evangelism, some people forever picture God, or our Lord, hesitantly waiting outside a heart’s door begging to come in. This is why, in our services, we have added the chorus “He is Lord” to the chorus “He’s the Savior of My Soul.” In the eagerness to get the good news out, we may caricature the fact that God comes in love. He comes to us in love, but He doesn’t come begging.

 

The Father of Glory by Pastor Melissa Scott

November 8, 2011 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott; https://www.youtube.com/user/inthebrokenplaces

Pastor Melissa Scott

 

Paul’s prayer begins in verse 15: “Paul, to the saints that are at Ephesus….” I want to emphasize that he is talking to believers, just as I am talking to believers today. If you have any interest in hearing, even if you think that your interest is merely out of curiosity, then the Spirit of God is drawing you to listen. Hear these words, please. “Wherefore I also, after I heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus, and love unto all the saints, cease not to give thanks for you, making mention of you in my prayers; That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you,” and He does, “may give unto you the spirit of wisdom, revelation in the fuller knowledge of him.

Pastor Melissa Scott tells us that the eyes of your heart,” literally, “of your understanding,” “be enlightened,” or “be illuminated,” “that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, what the riches of his glory of his inheritance in the saints, and what is the exceeding greatness of his power to usward who believe,” literally faithe, “who faithe according to the working of his mighty power.” He goes on to say, “Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, set him at his own right hand in the heavenlies. Far above principality, power, might and dominion and every name that is named, not only in this world, but the one which is to come. He put all things under his feet, and gave him as head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fullness of him that filleth all in all.”

That’s his first prayer in this letter, and it’s very subtle. We need to read this with the background knowledge that Paul is talking to converts at Ephesus. We could fall into the trap to say that he is speaking to those that don’t believe, that don’t have faith. No, he is speaking to those people who are already in the faith. And the last line of that prayer is pretty remarkable because he says, “the fullness of him that filleth all in all.”

Christ died on Calvary by Pastor Melissa Scott

November 4, 2011 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott Teaching from the Bible

 

Before I did the translation I was living with the spectacles of the King James Version. I had not looked it up. I do not spend all of my days looking up every single verse in the Bible all the time. So with this occasion, something stood out remarkably. “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people, upon thy holy city.” Now we’ve said “thy people” are Daniel’s people, the Jewish people, but we’re going to look to one place, Judah, as the source. Harness that thought in your mind. “Thy people and thy holy city,” Jerusalem, “to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins.”  Now how many have in your Bibles the word sins as plural? “And to make reconciliation for iniquity and to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up the vision in prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.”

Looking briefly at the grammar, we have the preposition “to,” “to finish”; the definite article “the” in “the transgression”; that is okay. “And to put an end,” uses the vav conjunction; “and to” again uses the preposition “to.” But the next part of the translation presents an anomaly when compared to the Hebrew. Literally, it should say, “and to put an end to the sin.” Notice the definite article before the word “sin.” It’s very subtle, but there is a world of difference between  sins in the sense of “the sins of the world,” and the expression “putting an end to sin.”

Pastor Melissa Scott tells us that we are, like the song says, sinners being saved by grace. So what Christ did on Calvary was a once and for all act. I am still in Adam, even though I’m a new creature in Christ. So to put an end definitively to “the sin” means everything that is wrong, including everything that is “missing the mark.” That is the meaning of the Greek word hamartia translated “sin” in the New Testament. It encompasses everything. So we have here “seventy weeks of sevens are decreed upon the people of you, the holy city of you to finish the transgression and to put an end to the sin.”