God’s Nature in the Stuff of History by Pastor Melissa Scott

May 3, 2015 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 
Jesus was a friend of sinners: He loved them. I want the 
world to know we love them. We don’t have to condone their sin;
we don’t have to wrap holy robes around ourselves. I don’t think
Jesus made a big deal out of His spirituality. I don’t believe
we have to make people so uncomfortable with our presence all
the time.
If you have God in you, you do not have to work so hard to
announce it. You will be different, because “He that saith he
abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he
walked.” If you are totally committed to Him, if nothing
matters as much to you in this life as doing God’s will, then
that will make you different. His burden will consume
you. You will be aware of His presence in the ordinary stuff
of the day when you iron clothes in the home, when you drive
down the freeway and when you work on the job. The majority
of this community will never come to hear a preacher preach,
but they will watch your sermon, that bringing of God’s
nature into the stuff of history.

God Sent For and Fetched Us by Pastor Melissa Scott

January 4, 2015 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

I’m examining my Christian experience as I preach today. I always preach to myself and then let you listen in. What does Jesus mean to me and to you? Do we really know what has happened?

Do we really understand that while everybody is wandering around in a place of no pastures, God sent for and fetched us?

This is the test: take the whole world, but give me Jesus. “Let him have it all. I got You!”

The one who has come unto the king’s table and begun to eat there has come to Jerusalem. Jerusalem means “the foundation of peace.” From Lodebar, a place of no pastures, to the foundation of peace.

That is what salvation is about.

Am I Abiding in Him?

April 26, 2014 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

That is what I ask of this church today: a band and a company of people who will settle for nothing less than genuine spirituality, who will ask themselves week after week, “Am I abiding in Him?”

We know, “He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked.” Analyze your commitment: does it match His?

If it doesn’t, then draw nigh.

Pastor Melissa Scott continues: Analyze your concern; if it doesn’t match His, then draw nigh to Him and renew the experience. Analyze your attitude about being a flowing light of the gospel and a flowing spring of His nature wherever your life, routines, and tedious detail take you. Analyze your dependence upon what other people do. Analyze your attitude toward the sinner. Analyze your motives. Do you come to church to be ministered to or do you live to minister?

Look at your humility; look at your own results among loved ones. For too long the church world has been running out bellowing with the mouth in little formulas of salvation.

We need to bring that ineffable nature of Jesus until those closest to us will wonder, “What’s made him different? He’s different every day.”

That is what spirituality is, and the Spirit came to be that in you and me if you give Him the chance.

The Pearl of Great Price by Pastor Melissa Scott

January 6, 2014 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

Worthlessness, unworthiness. I feel unworthy every day that God would let me be a part of His creative work in the lives of men; unworthy as a vessel because “we have this treasure in earthen vessels.”  (2 Corinthians 4:7)

I feel as unworthy as Isaiah felt when he saw the Lord. (Isaiah 6:5) There was a time when I was silly enough to “volunteer” for God, when I was younger and wanted to do His work for Him. I think I’ve begun to understand what a wonder it is that God, who has angels to do His work, lets us do it. I’m not the only one who feels this way. When you really understand God, a sense of unworthiness comes, and the sin that God forever has to deal with most harshly is pride. You can’t even get through that barrier; but once God’s broken the barrier of pride, then the devil starts gathering his forces and would press the attack until we feel worthless.

Now, God never dealt with man with rose-tinted glasses. When Jesus came, He said that we were lepers, we were blind, we were sick in need of a physician. He came to seek and to save that which was lost. He said it is the sick who need a physician and to them He came. Again, I want the Word to penetrate individual hearts.

You can smile at the world, but down deep the devil has you on the defensive. So if you feel worthless in the place where you are, read the parables of Matthew 13, and know the context of those parables taught by Jesus. He teaches three parables: a treasure in a field, a pearl of great price, and fish in a net. He says the Kingdom is like this: there is a treasure in a field and the price paid is sufficient to buy the whole field, that you might get the treasure. For too long, I’ve heard “the pearl of great price” mistreated in theology.

That pearl of great price is not Jesus. A goodly merchant will sell everything he has to get the pearl of great price. And they will drag in the good fish along with the bad fish; because the good fish have the value, they can be sorted out later.

Be Specific With God by Pastor Melissa Scott

August 19, 2013 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

In Romans 8, we read that Jesus is up there interceding for us and doing a good enough job, but in our limitations there needs to be articulation with specifics, because God responds to specifics. And I have said if your toe hurts, will you not pray some big long prayer to God, “O God, high on Your throne with angels flying around, door post shaking, smoke billowing, great and wonderful to be seen and heard….”

Just say, “Lord, my toe hurts, will You heal it?” “Little toe,” if you need to be specific: “My little toe hurts.” That is what the names of God mean. Are you in darkness?

“Who is among you?” Your darkness no doubt is specific, and you have no light? “Let him trust in the name of the LORD.” Find a name that gives light to the specific darkness you are in. Are you sick? Is that your darkness? Exodus 15: “I am Jehovah-rapha.

I am the LORD that healeth thee.” The phrase, “Let him trust” uses a word in the Greek Septuagint that is translated “faith” in the New Testament, which always adds a dimension beyond mere mental assent. You are not trusting if you just believe with your mind.  You are not even trusting if, in addition to believing with the mind, you respond with your heart. You are not trusting until you literally hang your body and attach it in action on what the mind has agreed to and the heart has responded to. In my darkness, I am told if it is sickness, “Let him trust in the name of the LORD”: God’s name, in Exodus 15, is Jehovah-raphe . He said it.

God’s Formula for Joy by Pastor Melissa Scott

January 5, 2013 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches from the Bible

Another word is also necessary to understand this law: “Let your
moderation be known.” Kenneth Wuest translates this passage:
“Let your reasonableness and your willingness to be content with 
less than your due be known.” Now, English is a funny language.
If you use the word post, you are liable to think of everything from
a fence post to dropping a letter in a mail box to a breakfast cereal.
The English word known has many varieties of meaning, but the Greek
word here is very precise.
There is knowing that can come from just seeing something
and having the mind assimilate it; logically, it is consistent
or it has meaning. There are other kinds of knowing. The Greek
word being used here is a knowing that is the result of
experiencing. It is a knowing that is strictly limited to a
knowledge that occurs only when you experience something.
Paul is saying to these Philippians, and to me and you today,
forever conquered by our circumstance, forever fretting, forever upset,
never exhibiting joy, “Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say,
Rejoice.” How? Let your state of mind be known, and let it so be
exhibited, that your willingness to be content with less than your
due will be known. Let it actually so flow out of you that you
are experienced by other people as being that kind of person.
Pastor Melissa Scott continues by saying that's easier to say than to do.
Have you ever seen a family argument? Have you ever been in one?
You are dying to have it made up. But you sit there and boil and
say, “You are going to apologize for every jot and tittle,
item by item, lay them all out and make every single
element right!”
Or somebody has done you some damage. You would like to have peace,
but “He did this to me and I’m going to have my pound of flesh.
I’m going to get what I have coming!”
Pastor Scott goes on to explain that only then, when you’ve forced
it out of them and every inch has been explained, apologized for,
and paid for will we graciously smile and “forgive.”

Fishing for Men and Women by Pastor Melissa Scott

August 12, 2012 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 
Pastor Scott teaches Sundays at Faith Center, Glendale CA

Pastor Melissa Scott teaches

I’m searching for men and women today.  But I’m fishing for the real trophies: the the uncommon kind of person who is not satisfied with the ordinary. So much of life squeezes everybody into the ordinary.

I don’t know what modern society would do with some of the “heroes of faith” if one were to come in and say that a bush talked to him. Or if another (Balaam, not a hero of faith) were to come in and say that his donkey talked to him. But God’s ways are not our ways. (Isaiah 55:8)

God needs some people who are willing to give it their all.

There is a strange saying in the Gospel of John, at the end of chapter 2, speaking of Jesus: “When he was in Jerusalem at the passover, in the feast day, many believed in his name, when they saw the miracles which he did. But Jesus did not commit himself unto them, because he knew all men, And needed not that any should testify of man: for he knew what was in man.”

Pastor Scott continues . . . In the name of evangelism, some people forever picture God, or our Lord, hesitantly waiting outside a heart’s door begging to come in. This is why, in our services, we have added the chorus “He is Lord” to the chorus “He’s the Savior of My Soul.” In the eagerness to get the good news out, we may caricature the fact that God comes in love. He comes to us in love, but He doesn’t come begging.

 

Christ died on Calvary by Pastor Melissa Scott

November 4, 2011 · Posted in Pastor Melissa Scott · Comments Off 

 

Pastor Melissa Scott Teaching from the Bible

 

Before I did the translation I was living with the spectacles of the King James Version. I had not looked it up. I do not spend all of my days looking up every single verse in the Bible all the time. So with this occasion, something stood out remarkably. “Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people, upon thy holy city.” Now we’ve said “thy people” are Daniel’s people, the Jewish people, but we’re going to look to one place, Judah, as the source. Harness that thought in your mind. “Thy people and thy holy city,” Jerusalem, “to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins.”  Now how many have in your Bibles the word sins as plural? “And to make reconciliation for iniquity and to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up the vision in prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy.”

Looking briefly at the grammar, we have the preposition “to,” “to finish”; the definite article “the” in “the transgression”; that is okay. “And to put an end,” uses the vav conjunction; “and to” again uses the preposition “to.” But the next part of the translation presents an anomaly when compared to the Hebrew. Literally, it should say, “and to put an end to the sin.” Notice the definite article before the word “sin.” It’s very subtle, but there is a world of difference between  sins in the sense of “the sins of the world,” and the expression “putting an end to sin.”

Pastor Melissa Scott tells us that we are, like the song says, sinners being saved by grace. So what Christ did on Calvary was a once and for all act. I am still in Adam, even though I’m a new creature in Christ. So to put an end definitively to “the sin” means everything that is wrong, including everything that is “missing the mark.” That is the meaning of the Greek word hamartia translated “sin” in the New Testament. It encompasses everything. So we have here “seventy weeks of sevens are decreed upon the people of you, the holy city of you to finish the transgression and to put an end to the sin.”